Tuesday, August 19, 2008

Kuih Dadar (Coconut Pancake)

I am very sorry that I haven't been updating my blog the past 2 weeks or so. Not becoz I am lazy but I've been busy. I came back to Singapore 2 weeks ago and then I went to Shah Alam(Malaysia) last week. Gosh.. I kinda hate the long traveling part.. tiring... Other than traveling, I also had a job interview in Singapore. (on a quick note, I got the job... yay!!) Anyway now I have to get back on blogging... :) This month, I have so many baking to do and I am so excited to start back working on it.

Well, yesterday early morning, I helped my grandma to make some delicious kuih for my mom who would sell the kuih-muih* at her food stall at Kim Keat Ave (Singapore). I love this kuih because its simply delicious and easy-to-make. The wrap is a combination of flour, eggs, and water or some use coconut milk. The filling is grated coconut, sweetened with gula melaka (palm sugar). Since my grandma do not use any measurement cups or weighing scales when mixing the ingredients, so I have to find the measurements... :)

*Kuih is the term given to various manners of bite-sized food items in Malay. They are usually - but not always - sweet and intricate creations, including cakes, cookies and puddings. It can also be described as pastry, however it is to be noted that the Asian concept of "cakes" and "pastries" is different from that of the Western one. Kuihs, plurified kueh-mueh or kuih-muih in Malay are more often steamed than baked, and thus very different in texture, flavour and appearance from Western cakes or puff pastries. Kuihs come in different shapes, colours, texture and designs. Some examples are filled, coated, wrapped, sliced and layered kuihs. Also, as mentioned earlier, most kuihs are steamed, with some being boiled or baked. They can also be deep-fried, and sometimes even grilled. Kuihs are not confined to a certain meal but are eaten throughout the day. (wikipedia)



Recipe: Kueh Dadar (Coconut Pancake)
Ingredients:
Filling:
90g palm sugar or brown sugar
40ml plain water
200g granted coconut, skin removed
1/3 tsp salt
1 egg

Cook palm sugar with water till palm sugar dissolves. Add grated coconut and salt, stir-fry till mixture is fairly dry. Then add the egg and mix well. Remove and set aside.


Batter:
100g all purpose flour
1 egg
1/3 tsp salt
1 tbsp pandan juice or green food colouring
150ml plain water
a few drops of vegetable oil


Sift flour and salt in a mixing bowl. Add the egg, pandan juice or green coloring, vegetable oil and water. Use a hand whisk to mix well and form a batter. Add a little more water if the batter is too thick.


Heat flat-bottomed frying pan and pour in a little oil. Pour enough batter and lightly swirl pan to let batter spread into a thin pancake.


Heat till pancake is cooked then remove and let cool.


Place the coconut filing on pancake (the top part when you cooked it).


Fold the left and right side first before the center part.


Roll the pancake like a spring roll.

Enjoy! :)







Remarks: Coconut filling you can make 1 week beforehand and keep cool inside fridge.

13 comments:

farida said...

This is one colorful pancake! Wow, green pancake. Never thought there was anything like this:) Looks good:)

lilmizlynn said...

Thanks farida. :)

Christina said...

I'm a singaporean too..thank you so much for the recipe i can't wait to make it! my family is sooo excited. I'll let u know how it turns out.

Za said...

AH!...interesting that you put an egg into the filling. Next time I'll try that.

lilmizlynn said...

Za, adding the egg is optional. must keep stirring the coconut when adding the egg to avoid the cooked egg in your inti yah.. hehe..

Vivian said...

Hi, I would like to know where did you get pandan juice and grated coconut? If it's replaced by green food coloring, does it have similar taste?

lilmizlynn said...

Hi Vivian, if you can get the pandan leaves (Screwpines), use a blender, put the leaves in, add some water and blend it all up, and don't forget to sieve the fibre of the pandan leaves before adding to the flour.. You'll get the juice and the green colour too. If not, it can be replaced with green coloring or even Koepoe Pandan Paste. No problem at all. This is just to make the wraps look more colorful.

For grated coconut, use fresh coconut and grate the white part. No fresh coconut, use the dry dessicated coconut.

Hope this helps.

Vivian said...

Thanks. I'm wondering where did you buy pandan leaves in Tennessee and also fresh grated coconut. Do people in Tennesse plant panadan leaves? If I substitute grated coconut with dry dessicated coconut, would it become very dry if I fry it?

lilmizlynn said...

Wish they have the plant so I can grow it at home here.. but so far, I do not see any. I got the frozen pandan leaves from an Asian grocery store. Also no fresh grated coconut, I grated the coconut meat myself here. Can u get any coconuts at the normal grocery store there? I tried the Walmart dessicated coconut and I do not like it becoz they were in big grated chunks.
Using the dry dessicated coconut, in a bowl, add hot water to the dessicated coconut for a little bit before you add to the sugar mixture so that the dessicated coconut will be soft. Add an egg, and it will not be dry..

Btw Vivian where are you at?

Vivian said...

I'm in Kansas. You grated coconut by yourself? 0.0 How? Where did you get coconut?

lilmizlynn said...

These kuih dadar was made when I was still in Singapore, so it was much easier to get the grated coconut. Here, I grated my own because, I do not like the Walmart dry dessicated coconut flakes. And I also got the coconut at Walmart. It was expensive. two over dollars for 1 coconut.

Za said...

Thanks for that advice! I'd have probably got fried egg in my coconut filling had u not mentioned the need to keep stirring.

I get my grated coconut from the Asian store - Uwajimaya. But I've seen the Indian stores having them in the freezer section lately too. Expensive but they keep really well in the freezer.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I am just wondering, is kuih dadar popular in Singapore?

Do you know about its history or origins? I am just curious! :)

Thanks!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...